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Paint Making Tools of the Trade

When I first started experimenting with handmade watercolors, I didn’t have any special tools. I had some ideas, a little bit of information, and a whole lot of curiosity. Along the way I discovered these things that have become my paint making tools of the trade.

Paint making tools of the Trade
Pigment on the mulling board, a muller. Some of the Paint making tools.

Making Do

Some of the tools are pricey, and if you went out and bought everything at once, it could add up to quite a hefty tab.

Thankfully, you don’t need it all, and you can make do with a bare minimum.

Here’s the post that marked my first time making art with my fresh idea for making my own paints.

These are the things I’d suggest as minimal:

  • spatulas
  • mulling plate
  • pans
  • small jars
  • dust masks – VERY important!
  • gum Arabic

A note about the mulling plate. When you first get it, the surface will be smooth. That won’t do for mulling paint. So you’ll need to run several trial batches on it with a gritty pigment to etch the surface enough to be able to actually do any good with your mulling. If you don’t want to waste valuable pigment, use coarse rubbing compound to get it started.

Leveling Up

After you’ve made some paint and tried out the process, you’ll know whether or not you like the paints enough to keep using them. That’s when I’d suggest getting a tool like the muller. There are also much more expensive mulling plates, or boards. I am still using my inexpensive tempered glass cutting plate from Walmart, but wouldn’t turn down a large slab of marble, lol.

My Favorite Paint Making Tools (So Far)

Some of these items are only applicable if you intend to start with foraged rocks or bought mineral specimens to make paint. Those are marked with an asterisk. I’ve linked to the Amazon listing for these, because that’s where I usually order my supplies.

There are other companies that sell these things. You can often find mullers used or less expensive on EBay. I do get a small amount of change if you order through Amazon after clicking these links, and the prices for you are the same whether you click and order through this post, or go there separately to shop.

Pigments of Other Places

At the moment, I’m a purist and only use pigments I’ve made and in my art I try to only use Ozark pigments. On occasion when I really want a blue or green, I use lapis lazuli, azurite, and malachite- none of which are Ozark pigments. However, I’m in the beginning stages of collecting pigments from other locations.

I’ll be creating collections from those places and calling them “Colors of Place”. I’d like to also collaborate with other regional pigment foragers so I can offer colors of their places, too.

Future Paint Making Tools

There are a couple of items I’d like to acquire in the future. A larger rock tumbler/rock grinder and a roller mill. I’d need to start making much larger quantities of paints (and accompanying sales) to make those practical buys!


Paint-Making Supplies from Wild Ozark

Madison Woods is an author, artist, and Paleo Paint maker living
with her husband in northwest Arkansas far off the beaten path. She uses Ozark pigments to create her paintings.

To see her paintings click here.

Contact Info:
Email: [email protected]
Instagram: @wildozark
Facebook: @wildozark

Thoughts, info, or feedback to share?