Photos Ginseng Roots from 2015 Season

9/14 (Ohio) Holy Cow- Looks like a man!

The rich Ohio soil sure turns out some nice roots.

From Marcia: “Second day out digging roots and I had a new person with me. So I was showing him what other roots look like, etc. And then off in a distant I saw what appeared to be a nice ginseng plant but was not sure. Told him to come on lets check this out and yup, come up to the plant and it stood knee high. It was a four prong. The root looks like a man. Even has a face like a man. How do I post you a picture of it? Looks like it is going to be a good year for digging. We had let the woods go for several years since the last harvest. It may pay off. Feeling excited.”

Ohio ginseng roots 2015 2-Ohio ginseng plant 2015 Ohio ginseng roots 2015, looks like a man!

9/7 Arkansas

Here’s a root photo sent to me by a local Ozarks ginseng root digger. I can’t see all of the neck scars in the picture, but he says it is 44 years old. The lighter is a full-sized one put there beside the root for size reference.

Personally, I cringe to know such an old root is going to die, but I know he is thrilled to have been the one to take it and the end-buyer who uses it will love it, too. This was taken by a conscientious digger who always replants the berries and never digs out his spots. He and his grandfathers before him had used the same locations for generations.

old American Ginseng root
old American Ginseng root

More root photos from 2015

Send your photos to me if you want me to put them on the blog (madison(at)wildozark(dot)com).

This one is another old one from the Ozarks. The digger said it actually looks like more than one plant that has grown into each other. Altogether it is more than 50 years old. The roots had two smallish plants attached to them. Because they were small, he didn’t think it would yield a big root and was totally surprised to find this:

A very old American ginseng root from the Ozarks
A very old American ginseng root from the Ozarks, 2015 season

2 or 3 in one very old ginseng root


About Wild Ozark
Wild Ozark is a nature farm. Mostly we grow rocks. I use those rocks and some of the herbs to make earth pigments and watercolor paints. We also grow native clay that I use for making my Fairy Swing Mushrooms. And then there are the trees. We grow lots of trees. My husband uses some for his woodworking and some for our Burnt Kettle Shagbark Hickory Syrup, but for the most part they stand around creating good air, shade, & habitat for the ginseng nursery.
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About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods
I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. You can find my art on display and for sale at the Kingston Square Arts shop in Kingston, Arkansas. It's a tiny little town and a bit off the path to anywhere at all, but a wonderful ride out to a most beautiful part of our state. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making arts & crafty things, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.

5 thoughts on “Photos Ginseng Roots from 2015 Season

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  1. Second day out digging roots and I had a new person with me. So I was showing him what other roots look like, etc. And then off in a distant I saw what appeared to be a nice ginseng plant but was not sure. Told him to come on lets check this out and yup, come up to the plant and it stood knee high. It was a four prong. The root looks like a man. Even has a face like a man. How do I post you a picture of it? Looks like it is going to be a good year for digging. We had let the woods go for several years since the last harvest. It may pay off. Feeling excited.

    1. Hey Marcia, that sounds pretty exciting indeed. If you email it to me (madison(at)wildozark(dot)com), I’ll post your photo with your story as the caption. I’d love to see it!

      Everything seems to benefit from a fallow season or two, and I’m sure your ginseng were busy reproducing during that time, too.