Life in the Dead of Winter

I enjoy seeing signs of life in the dead of winter. This week hasn’t been the typical dead of winter. Today was a beautiful day, sunny and nearly 70*F, and I became tired of figuring taxes. Time to go outside and move rocks around in the garden. I brought the camera to get some pics of bits of green contrasting with the sandy browns of our soil and the darker hues of dead brown leaves. I knew there’d be some life in the otherwise dead zone.

green onions

The green onions (above) grow somewhat all year long. I love having them ready to use anytime, but some times of the year, like now, a bit more trimming and cleaning up of the greens is required.

thyme

Thyme (above and below) still manages to stay looking pretty beneath the curled up cover of dead elm leaves.

thyme closer

Wispy tendrils of wild onion reach out from beneath this rock in my garden (below). These work like chives if you snip up the green parts. I’m sure I wouldn’t enjoy having so many of these around if I were trying to graze milk goats or cows, but I like the abundance of wild onions and garlic around here.

wild onion

Aside from taking pictures of the living things, I moved a heavy rock into place where I needed another step. It took quite a bit of maneuvering to get it where I wanted it, but it works perfectly in that place. Now I’m one rock closer to being finished with the garden path starting at the gate going down to the lowest terrace. It’s not a very large garden, in fact it’s very small. I can’t imagine trying to move enough rocks to make a large one of the kind I see in my imagination!

big rock step

 

 


First Hunt by Ima ErthwitchPredator and Prey, or the hunter and the hunted is a common theme throughout my fiction writing. No Qualms, one of my short stories (free at most retailers) is about about a predator/prey relationship. Symbiosis, my first finished novel, not published yet, deals with predator/prey relationships and the balance of energy among life on earth, sometimes symbolic and often outright. Many of my flash fiction stories (I have twitterfiction and 100-word flash stories) are also dealing with this same dynamic. This is a strong theme that runs through most of my fiction and is strongly influenced by life in the wild Ozarks where we live. My first published novel, First Hunt, also has a predator and prey theme to it. I guess it's just part of my nature.

Nature Farming


Wild Ozark is 160 acres of beautiful wild Ozark mountains. I call what I do "nature farming" because the land produces, all by itself, the shagbark hickory trees, ferns, moss, ground-fall botanicals, and the perfect habitats for growing and stewarding American ginseng. I'm co-creating with Nature - all of the things I use to make the Fairy Gardens and Forest Folk, the bark we harvest for Burnt Kettle's shagbark hickory syrup, are produced by nature without my input. This land is my muse for inspiration when it comes to my writing, drawing, and photography. It's truly a Nature Farm.

About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


2 thoughts on “Life in the Dead of Winter

  1. I’ll have to check out that blog, Ned. I think I’ll have a lot more rock moving in my future. Yes, the mosses have been loving this weather here too! Thanks for dropping by 🙂

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