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Life in the Dead of Winter

I enjoy seeing signs of life in the dead of winter. This week hasn’t been the typical dead of winter. Today was a beautiful day, sunny and nearly 70*F, and I became tired of figuring taxes. Time to go outside and move rocks around in the garden. I brought the camera to get some pics of bits of green contrasting with the sandy browns of our soil and the darker hues of dead brown leaves. I knew there’d be some life in the otherwise dead zone.

green onions

The green onions (above) grow somewhat all year long. I love having them ready to use anytime, but some times of the year, like now, a bit more trimming and cleaning up of the greens is required.

thyme

Thyme (above and below) still manages to stay looking pretty beneath the curled up cover of dead elm leaves.

thyme closer

Wispy tendrils of wild onion reach out from beneath this rock in my garden (below). These work like chives if you snip up the green parts. I’m sure I wouldn’t enjoy having so many of these around if I were trying to graze milk goats or cows, but I like the abundance of wild onions and garlic around here.

wild onion

Aside from taking pictures of the living things, I moved a heavy rock into place where I needed another step. It took quite a bit of maneuvering to get it where I wanted it, but it works perfectly in that place. Now I’m one rock closer to being finished with the garden path starting at the gate going down to the lowest terrace. It’s not a very large garden, in fact it’s very small. I can’t imagine trying to move enough rocks to make a large one of the kind I see in my imagination!

big rock step

 

 

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Edward Downie
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Edward Downie

Speaking of moving big rocks:

The J-Walk Blog: Moving Big Rocks:
http://j-walkblog.com/index.php?/weblog/posts/moving_big_rocks

You may need to scale Wallington’s techniques for your comparatively small rocks.

The plants I’ve been most impressed with this winter are the mosses. With all the rain and overcast skies, they have done unusually well.

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