A Ginseng Habitat Demonstration Garden

Note: The garden habitat garden is closes in October. It’ll open again when the unfurling begins (mid-April, early May).

Beginning in May 2017 there will be a place to go for anyone interested in seeing ginseng growing in a natural environment.

The goal is to teach about the habitat and encourage wild-simulated planting, and conserving or re-establishing habitats, but not necessarily forest farming.

I’m planning to open by appointment only for now, but it will be available to the public at no cost. We have one other sanctuary that we installed with the help of a grant from United Plant Savers, but it is in a public botanical garden setting (Compton Gardens in Bentonville, AR).

The one here at Wild Ozark is a natural wild habitat which was once destroyed by logging that’s now suitable again after years of regrowth. I’ve enhanced it with trails and replanted ginseng and the companion plants back to it, and will be adding signs/labels for the plants.

My hope is that education will help people realize the fragility of this type of ecosystem and motivate more conservation/preservation mindedness even among those who want to grow it for future wild-simulated root harvests.

Click here to read more about the American Ginseng Garden.

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Description

Note: The garden habitat garden is closes in October. It’ll open again when the unfurling begins (mid-April, early May).

The goal is to teach about the habitat and encourage wild-simulated planting, and conserving or re-establishing habitats, but not necessarily forest farming.

I’m planning to open by appointment only for now, but it will be available to the public at no cost. We have one other sanctuary that we installed with the help of a grant from United Plant Savers, but it is in a public botanical garden setting (Compton Gardens in Bentonville, AR).

The one here at Wild Ozark is a natural wild habitat which was once destroyed by logging that’s now suitable again after years of regrowth. I’ve enhanced it with trails and replanted ginseng and the companion plants back to it, and will be adding signs/labels for the plants.

My hope is that education will help people realize the fragility of this type of ecosystem and motivate more conservation/preservation mindedness even among those who want to grow it for future wild-simulated root harvests.

Click here to read more about the American Ginseng Garden.


About Wild Ozark
Wild Ozark is a nature farm. Mostly we grow rocks. I use those rocks and some of the herbs to make earth pigments and watercolor paints. We also grow native clay that I use for making my Fairy Swing Mushrooms. And then there are the trees. We grow lots of trees. My husband uses some for his woodworking and some for our Burnt Kettle Shagbark Hickory Syrup, but for the most part they stand around creating good air, shade, & habitat for the ginseng nursery.
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About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods
I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. You can find my art on display and for sale at the Kingston Square Arts shop in Kingston, Arkansas. It's a tiny little town and a bit off the path to anywhere at all, but a wonderful ride out to a most beautiful part of our state. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making arts & crafty things, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.

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