Slugs and Dragons and Ginseng, Oh My! Wild Ozark Creations

I’ve been working on a few new Wild Ozark creations lately. This creative streak seems to have no end in sight, either, because ideas just keep coming and I keep feeling compelled to follow them through.

Slugs

This is the latest drawing I’ve done. The digital and print rights (for business branding, not art prints) and print #1/100 have been sold already, but there are still 99 prints available. I had so much fun doing this drawing, because it made me see poison ivy and slugs in an entirely new light. Whoever knew the two of them could be beautiful together?

Slug on Poison Ivy
Slug on Poison Ivy

Dragons

I’ve been photographing a particular green dragon (Arisaema dracontium) over the past few years, trying to get good photos of all the various phases. A couple of years ago, I even had seeds that I’d gathered from it sprout.

So I was finally able to complete a creative thing that’s been waiting a long time – The Dragon Life Storyboard:

A poster showing the growth phases of a green dragon plant.
A poster showing the growth phases of a green dragon plant.

You can get this poster at our Wild Ozark online shop: https://shop.wildozark.com/shop/posters-of-ozark-plants/. If you know any science teachers who might like to decorate a classroom, send them my way!

You can read more about Green Dragons on one of my earlier posts.

Ginseng

So then I thought, “Well, I can’t have a dragon storyboard without a ginseng one too!”

Story of Ginseng
Story of Ginseng

Pressed Leaves

And for ginseng I also have been making pressed leaves. Some of them are laminated so they’re durable enough to take to the woods. Some I’ll mount on fine art paper for framing.  Only the laminated ones are posted to the shop so far. They’re $10.

Mature ginseng leaf prong

Fiction

I’ve been working on my novel and am getting excited by how it’s going. Here’s the story line for that:

Bounty Hunter is a rural adventure fantasy set in post-collapse northwest Arkansas. There’s a rift in the Universal fabric that the Feds aren’t telling anyone about, but it’s the main reason martial law is still in effect. Treya is training to be an assassin for ARSA, a covert government agency headquartered in Bentonville. Punishment isn’t that the criminals are put to death. It’s that they’re killed three times to force them into successively lower incarnations. Treya has to learn how to use her innate gifts that enable her to track a person throughout their incarnations, whether they’re human or not.

Your Turn!

So tell me what projects you’ve been working on? Send links if you have posts about them or Etsy listings or whatever and I’ll link to them. My email address is madison@wildozark.com.

 

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About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


Ways You Can Support Wild Ozark

  • Spread the Word

    Share this post or tell a friend about my website. "From little acorns do mighty oaks grow." A little thing like sharing could start momentum! This is a free and tremendously powerful way to help.

  • Buy a Book

    See all of my books here: Madison Woods Amazon Author's Page.

  • Shop at our Nature Boutique

    Unique gifts, books, and information for the nature lovers in your life. Adding more items as time allows: Wild Ozark Nature Boutique.

  • Become a Patron

    A small monthly stipend of even $1 from enough supporters will help me continue the educational outreach and construction of habitat gardens. More information here: https://www.patreon.com/wildozark

Thank you for reading and/or participating in this Wild Ozark community! ~ Madison Woods

Transplanting Ginseng Seedlings

In preparation for next month’s talk at the Fayetteville Public Library’s Try FPL Series, I’ll be transplanting ginseng seedlings to pots. Each member of the audience will get to take one home. That event is on Wed, June 8 from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. at the Fayetteville Public Library in downtown Fayetteville, AR. This event is free and open to the public.

nature journal workshop flierComing up before the ginseng event is a Nature Journaling workshop at The Place on the Square in Kingston, AR. Each participant of that event will be guided through a journal entry with a nature sketch and they’ll get one of my Nature Journals to take home with them. I’ll also bring several copies of the ginseng color page outline to send home with them. I’ll have the full package (outline and printed step-by-step guide) available to purchase and will leave plenty of sets of those behind to sell alongside my books and artwork at the shop. Seating for this event is limited, so be sure to call if you want to attend.

Transplanting Ginseng Seedlings

First year ginseng seedlings are fragile and difficult to ship bare-root. They transplant well into pots, though, so this is how we usually sell our plants.

This year we had bad luck with the seeds going dormant again, but we found that all the seeds we planted year before last, that had also gone dormant before we planted them, were sprouting this year. So at least I can get busy transplanting ginseng seedlings from seeds sown two years back.

American ginseng seedling soon after sprouting.
American ginseng seedling soon after sprouting.

I just dig them up with a ball of their own native soil surrounding them and transplant to small pots with commercial soil-less potting mix. To ship them this way, because of regulations, I’d have to knock all the native soil off of them and I’m not sure how well they’d do without a little of the native soil.

Just as mature ginseng has lookalike plants, there are lookalikes for ginseng seedlings. Click To Tweet
I'm transplanting ginseng seedlings. Here's a pic of not ginseng and ginseng.
Not ginseng and ginseng

Ginseng Seedling Lookalikes

Usually it’s the same culprits, like Virginia Creeper and wild strawberry, but one lookalike in particular gets pretty tricky. Elm seedlings look more like ginseng seedlings to me than any other look-alike. Sometimes the elm seedlings only have three leaves showing, making it even more similar to the ginseng. In the photo above, the ginseng seedling is at the top, nearly out of the photo. The elm seedling is the one with four leaves in the center. There is a poison ivy plant at the top left, nearly out of the frame.

I’ll be trying to get at least 50 seedlings potted today.

Update 5/22

I did manage to get more than 50 seedlings transplanted.

Ginseng seedlings transplanted to pots. I keep them in the shade with a light cover of dead leaves.
Ginseng seedlings transplanted to pots. I keep them in the shade with a light cover of dead leaves.

One of the seedlings had grown up through a skeletal leaf. I liked the way that looked and left it there, potting it leaf skeleton and all:

Lacy skeleton leaf of ginseng seedling.
Lacy skeleton leaf on ginseng seedling.

While I was at it, I made a very short video clip (terrible quality, sorry) to show the ginseng seedlings versus the elm seedling lookalikes:

Most positive ID possible

If the seedling still has a seed attached to the stem and root, it’s the most positive way I know to be certain of the identity:

Ginseng seedling with the seed still attached.
Ginseng seedling with the seed still attached.

 

 

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About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


Ways You Can Support Wild Ozark

  • Spread the Word

    Share this post or tell a friend about my website. "From little acorns do mighty oaks grow." A little thing like sharing could start momentum! This is a free and tremendously powerful way to help.

  • Buy a Book

    See all of my books here: Madison Woods Amazon Author's Page.

  • Shop at our Nature Boutique

    Unique gifts, books, and information for the nature lovers in your life. Adding more items as time allows: Wild Ozark Nature Boutique.

  • Become a Patron

    A small monthly stipend of even $1 from enough supporters will help me continue the educational outreach and construction of habitat gardens. More information here: https://www.patreon.com/wildozark

Thank you for reading and/or participating in this Wild Ozark community! ~ Madison Woods

Ginseng in May – A Nature Sketch

I’m recording the process of my “Ginseng in May” sketch that I’m doing for the first Kingston, AR art show. And it’s the first art show I’ve ever entered. This sketch is the first I’ve ever done that took so long, lol, so this is a first on many levels.

Follow along at my Wild Ozark Nature Journal website: http://www.wildozarknaturejournal.com/ginseng-in-may/

Here’s how it started out:

color outline of my sketch of Ginseng in May
color outline

“Ginseng in May” – the finished sketch:

"Ginseng in May" by Madison Woods, colored pencil on paper
“Ginseng in May” by Madison Woods, colored pencil on paper

 

At the Wild Ozark Nature Journal Blog I go into explanations of how, why and what I did. Here’s a link to all of the ginseng-related posts at this blog. Under the “Ginseng” tab on the menu at the top of this page, you’ll find other pages on ginseng that don’t show up as posts.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I ♥ Wild Ozark's blog! #Nature www.wildozark.com Click To Tweet

About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


Ways You Can Support Wild Ozark

  • Spread the Word

    Share this post or tell a friend about my website. "From little acorns do mighty oaks grow." A little thing like sharing could start momentum! This is a free and tremendously powerful way to help.

  • Buy a Book

    See all of my books here: Madison Woods Amazon Author's Page.

  • Shop at our Nature Boutique

    Unique gifts, books, and information for the nature lovers in your life. Adding more items as time allows: Wild Ozark Nature Boutique.

  • Become a Patron

    A small monthly stipend of even $1 from enough supporters will help me continue the educational outreach and construction of habitat gardens. More information here: https://www.patreon.com/wildozark

Thank you for reading and/or participating in this Wild Ozark community! ~ Madison Woods

Ginseng Seedling When it Comes Up in the First Year from a Seed

Ginseng seedling day 2
A first year ginseng seedling the second day after unfurling.

Here's what a ginseng seedling looks like when it comes up for the first time from a seed. Click To Tweet

Ginseng Seedling

In the first year, an American ginseng seedling has three leaves and looks a little bit like a wild strawberry plant.  It does not look much like an older ginseng plant from years two or older. The photo was taken on the second day after it emerged, but it looked pretty much the same right after it finished unfurling its leaves yesterday.

There’s More

If you look closely, you can see another one just beginning to come up in the lower left corner and another left of the stick in the lower right. And I just noticed another one near the middle at the top, but it’s not in focus. Click on the photo for a larger image.

Want to Compare?

If you want to see what the wild strawberry looks like, I have a page that compares them to each other.

I ♥ Wild Ozark's blog! #Nature www.wildozark.com Click To Tweet

About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


Ways You Can Support Wild Ozark

  • Spread the Word

    Share this post or tell a friend about my website. "From little acorns do mighty oaks grow." A little thing like sharing could start momentum! This is a free and tremendously powerful way to help.

  • Buy a Book

    See all of my books here: Madison Woods Amazon Author's Page.

  • Shop at our Nature Boutique

    Unique gifts, books, and information for the nature lovers in your life. Adding more items as time allows: Wild Ozark Nature Boutique.

  • Become a Patron

    A small monthly stipend of even $1 from enough supporters will help me continue the educational outreach and construction of habitat gardens. More information here: https://www.patreon.com/wildozark

Thank you for reading and/or participating in this Wild Ozark community! ~ Madison Woods

Ginseng Coffee and other “Wild Blends” from Wild Ozark

Ginseng Coffee from Wild Ozark

Unfortunately, we have found out that the state of Arkansas does not allow the roasting and selling of fresh roasted coffee without a permitted commercial kitchen. Therefore our delicious home-roasted Wild Ozark Blends and Coffees will only be available as gifts to friends and family from now on until, or unless, we invest in a permitted facility. If you know of information to the contrary about the selling or roasting of artisan coffees, please let me know.

Why home roasted and why ginseng coffee?

Because we  love it. We love the way it smells while we’re roasting it, love the way it smells when grinding, and absolutely love the flavor.  We love trying the various types of beans and whether it’s beans roasted to perfection alone or with our favorite additive to make ginseng coffee, it’s wonderful.

Ginseng coffee delivers a steady energy,  a better ability to focus and stay on task, and imparts a general feeling of well-being to my day*. Ginseng alone does this quite well, and coffee alone has numerous benefits too, but together they dance a very sexy tango. I love it.

Rob and I recently invested in a roaster to further pursue our obsession to have fresh, aromatic, ecstatically flavorful coffee. And now we can make enough to sell at the farmers market and through our online shop.

So we’ll have coffee in whatever iterations our imagination comes up with. Ginseng coffee using leaf or root, dandelion and chicory coffee, a sampling of different beans in plain (but never ordinary) coffee.

Why oh why aren't fresh home-roasted coffee beans allowed at markets in AR? Click To Tweet

 

Cautions

*Ginseng and coffee together may have undesirable side-effects. Both are stimulating. Ginseng is an herb that has been used for many years for many things, but you should do your own research to determine if it is safe for you.

Most of the research has been performed using Panax ginseng, which is the Asian species. Our American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) may have similar stimulating properties.

Here’s a good website about the properties of ginseng that also covers the contraindications (why some people should not use ginseng): http://en.mr-ginseng.com/ginseng-panax/

The amount of ginseng leaf or root in our coffee blend is not considered a “high dose”, and we do not use extract of ginseng.

Wild Roast coffee from Wild Ozark is delicious!
Wild Roast from Wild Ozark is delicious!

Fresh Roast

If we don’t sell the current week’s roast, regardless of which “Wild Roast” it is,  before the end of the third day, those beans go in our freezer for us to use in our personal coffee. The whole point of “fresh roast” is for it to be “fresh”, right?

So that’s why we only roast them the way we ourselves like them. Because we don’t want to have to use the oily black, burnt beans if no one else buys them.

However, if you really like yours very light or very dark and want to prepay for a special batch, just email me.

Our packaging

We vacuum seal our coffee in 1/2 pound portions. If you buy a whole pound and it’s all in one bag, the entire bag begins to oxidize the minute you open the container or bag. This way, only half of the pound is exposed to air at one time.

We use sous vide bags. This is huge! The bags are freezable, boilable, and microwaveable. They are BPA free and manufactured in the USA.

Because all we did was put coffee in them, they haven’t been exposed to high heat at all. If you want to reuse them to cook in, just make a clean cut to dump out the beans or grounds, clean and dry the bag before filling it with the food of your choice. Then use your vacuum sealer to close them up.

I ♥ Wild Ozark's blog! #Nature www.wildozark.com Click To Tweet

About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


Ways You Can Support Wild Ozark

  • Spread the Word

    Share this post or tell a friend about my website. "From little acorns do mighty oaks grow." A little thing like sharing could start momentum! This is a free and tremendously powerful way to help.

  • Buy a Book

    See all of my books here: Madison Woods Amazon Author's Page.

  • Shop at our Nature Boutique

    Unique gifts, books, and information for the nature lovers in your life. Adding more items as time allows: Wild Ozark Nature Boutique.

  • Become a Patron

    A small monthly stipend of even $1 from enough supporters will help me continue the educational outreach and construction of habitat gardens. More information here: https://www.patreon.com/wildozark

Thank you for reading and/or participating in this Wild Ozark community! ~ Madison Woods

So How does Ginseng Taste?

photo of box of ginseng
This is the little box where we keep our dried ginseng root.

Ginseng Taste

So how does ginseng taste? The first flavor when you put a little piece of the root in your mouth is bitterness, but it’s not too intense of a bitterness. A bit of that bitterness lingers the whole time, too. Then there’s also an earthy sweetness, similar but not the same as carrot – a not so sweet carrot.

Do not eat an entire root in one day!

Eating too much ginseng is probably bad for you. My son ate a whole one when he first started digging. He didn’t sleep for two days and he said it felt like his heart was going to jump out of his chest. This is not a good thing, so don’t do it.

We usually chew a small piece, like  you see broken off in the photo below, all day. Just tuck it on the side of your jaw, don’t chew it like gum. Squeeze it every once in a while with your tongue against the roof of your mouth, or gently between your teeth, and put it back on the side.

When you want to eat or get tired of keeping it in there, put it on a plate or somewhere that you can go back to it later. As long as the bitter flavor remains, it still contains ginseng goodness.

Some people use the root in broths. I’ve ground some and used it in my coffee. I really like it that way.

a piece of dried ginseng root
The dried ginseng root, ready to chew.

I have a monthly inventory report for those who are interested in buying exceptional wild ginseng roots and leaves for personal consumption (ships to US addresses only).

Keeo up with the roots report

 

 

 

 

Ginseng

Most of the searches that bring people to this site are about how to find ginseng. Not so many seem to wonder about how to use the ginseng itself. I think most are only interested in exploiting the root for profit. We don’t dig our roots here to sell because we don’t have enough of it yet. When the population reaches a sustainable level (at least 100 plants of mixed ages per colony) we’ll harvest roots, but that’s going to be years down the road from now. Right now the focus is on habitat restoration.

In our Wild Ozark™ Nursery, though, we do plant extra seeds so I can sell rootlets and potted ginseng plants to others who want to grow it. It makes a pretty potted plant or specimen feature in shade gardens. We also offer companions to make the habitat complete.

The Ozark’s own best-selling author, photographer, consultant, and herbalist Steven Foster posted at his herbal blog about the issues he sees with the television show “Appalachian Outlaws”. My hope is that some of the people who come here searching for information because they’ve watched that show will become interested in the plant and shift their focus from the potential money in digging to a concern and desire to help it survive. I wrote a short book called “Sustainable Ginseng” with information on how land-owners can grow it in a way that’s indistinguishable from true wild. Grown this way it can be used for personal remedies as I describe below, or sold just like wild – all without adding extra stress to the survival of the plants still holding their own in our hills.


Some of our books:


For the most part, I just study the ginseng and grow it. I get a lot of enjoyment from finding new plants, growing new colonies, and just observing grandmother plants with her babies throughout the growing season. But every so often we do dig a few for our own personal use and I thought I’d talk a little today about how I use it. Dr. Laurell Matthews wrote about the virtues of ginseng root on her Natural Health blog the other day. The last time we dug any of our own was a few years ago. I keep the roots in a paper bag along with the other herbs I’ve harvested for household use.

herbs in paper bagsWhen I take out a ginseng root I put it in the little ox-bone box pictured at the top of this post and keep it in the kitchen. My husband got that little box for me when he was in Iraq or Afghanistan and I think it makes a fitting resting place for a single root of a plant I hold in high regard. That same root has been in the box for several months because I don’t use it every day. If I’m working on a project that requires more concentration and focus than I’m ordinarily prone to, I’ll keep a little piece of the root in my mouth all day. I take it out and set it on the side of my plate if I eat or put it down somewhere if I’m having a cup of coffee, but I keep the same piece in use all day. It’s sort of like keeping the same piece of chewing gum, I guess, but I don’t actually “chew” the root. Every once in a while I’ll bite down on it to squeeze the juice out of it. Yes, I know that sounds pretty gross, given that the juice is made from my saliva, ha. But the saliva is also extracting the goodness of ginseng while it sits on standby in my mouth.

If I think I have a cold or other illness coming on, I’ll use it the same way. Ginseng is an adaptogen and will try to help the body overcome stresses of any sort. This is also what I’ll do with it if we’re doing some sort of work that is physical and I want to maintain stamina throughout the day (like when we’re working on a fence project).

If you’re interested in growing your own virtually-wild ginseng and need some help figuring out where to plant, take a look at our books. By learning the ginseng companion plants, it’ll help you find the best places to plant.

 

I ♥ Wild Ozark's blog! #Nature www.wildozark.com Click To Tweet

About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


Ways You Can Support Wild Ozark

  • Spread the Word

    Share this post or tell a friend about my website. "From little acorns do mighty oaks grow." A little thing like sharing could start momentum! This is a free and tremendously powerful way to help.

  • Buy a Book

    See all of my books here: Madison Woods Amazon Author's Page.

  • Shop at our Nature Boutique

    Unique gifts, books, and information for the nature lovers in your life. Adding more items as time allows: Wild Ozark Nature Boutique.

  • Become a Patron

    A small monthly stipend of even $1 from enough supporters will help me continue the educational outreach and construction of habitat gardens. More information here: https://www.patreon.com/wildozark

Thank you for reading and/or participating in this Wild Ozark community! ~ Madison Woods

What’s the Big Deal About Ginseng?

This is the topic of my 10-minute speech for the Meet the Author’s Event on Saturday, Feb. 6,  at the Kimberling City Library. My talk, “What’s the Big Deal about Ginseng” is at 11:10 but there will be lots of other authors there giving their 10 minutes of engaging content, too. The allotted time may not be enough to cover all of the details in the article below, but I’ll be there most of the day to answer questions if you have any.

Here’s a PDF with the schedule. I hope you’ll come out to meet and greet your favorite local authors. I’ll have a bit of table space and all of my books, so if you want one autographed, it’s a perfect opportunity.

What is Ginseng?

Wondering what's the big deal about ginseng?
A ginseng plant with ripe berries.

Ginseng is a small understory woodland perennial plant that can live a long time. The oldest one I’ve seen from the Ozarks was about 45 years, but it can live to be 100 or more. It’s not a very large plant and the root, the part most often bought and sold, isn’t very large either.

The leaves and ripe berries have a market too, but those parts are not as much in demand as the roots.

Ginseng grows in China, Korea, Vietnam, and Siberia as well. Our north American species is called Panax quinquefolius. The other ginseng varieties in other countries have other species names, but they all belong to the genus Panax.

Here’s a post with photos if you’d like to see what ginseng looks like at various stages of growth.

 

 

I ♥ Wild Ozark's blog! #Nature www.wildozark.com Click To Tweet

About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


Ways You Can Support Wild Ozark

  • Spread the Word

    Share this post or tell a friend about my website. "From little acorns do mighty oaks grow." A little thing like sharing could start momentum! This is a free and tremendously powerful way to help.

  • Buy a Book

    See all of my books here: Madison Woods Amazon Author's Page.

  • Shop at our Nature Boutique

    Unique gifts, books, and information for the nature lovers in your life. Adding more items as time allows: Wild Ozark Nature Boutique.

  • Become a Patron

    A small monthly stipend of even $1 from enough supporters will help me continue the educational outreach and construction of habitat gardens. More information here: https://www.patreon.com/wildozark

Thank you for reading and/or participating in this Wild Ozark community! ~ Madison Woods

Meet our new team mates – Bat Cave Botanicals

Wild Ozark is pleased to announce that we’ll be working with Bat Cave Botanicals to bring wild Appalachian ginseng roots and leaf products to our online shop.


Martin & Sara of Bat Cave BotanicalsAbout Bat Cave Botanicals

My partner & I are fortunate to live in a region of the world where ginseng grows wild. The mountains of Western North Carolina have a long standing heritage that includes hunting for ginseng & other herbs for folk medicine as well as international market value. To protect the future of this incredible plant from over-harvest, cultivation & good stewardship practices are essential in order to satisfy demand and thus relieve the pressure being placed on the wild plant by high commercial value.

We have been growing ginseng and protecting a wild population for over 10 years. This is our second season of selling ginseng online and we specialize in ethically harvested, premium wild ginseng roots. ‘Ethical harvest’ means digging roots only in the proper season, selectively harvesting less than one third any population, and zealously planting the red berries which contain the ginseng seeds.

We became involved in the ginseng business because of our mutual love of nature, cultural history, and an interest in finding a new way to profitably market ginseng as a commodity while at the same time showing respect & providing guardianship for this rare & fascinating plant.

We are located in Bat Cave, North Carolina; surrounded by the beautiful southern Appalachian mountains. We specialize in superior quality Wild American ginseng roots & products, as well as many other native & useful plants.

Bat Cave Botanicals is a registered North Carolina Ginseng Dealer. We comply with all Federal & North Carolina regulations concerning the harvest, inspection, certification & sale of Wild American Ginseng. We abide by an ethical code regarding the stewardship & harvest of Ginseng and other at-risk plants.

Martin & Sara
Bat Cave Botanicals

Martin and Sara’s premium roots are available for purchase at Wild Ozark’s online shop. Each month I send out an inventory update report just for our ginseng products. Sign up for that list if you want to stay informed. Right now only the roots from Bat Cave Botanicals are listed. Soon I’ll be adding Ozark roots from our new Ozarks team mates who will be introduced in the near future, and some of my own ginseng-related products.

Keeo up with the roots report


 

 

 

 

 

I ♥ Wild Ozark's blog! #Nature www.wildozark.com Click To Tweet

About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


Ways You Can Support Wild Ozark

  • Spread the Word

    Share this post or tell a friend about my website. "From little acorns do mighty oaks grow." A little thing like sharing could start momentum! This is a free and tremendously powerful way to help.

  • Buy a Book

    See all of my books here: Madison Woods Amazon Author's Page.

  • Shop at our Nature Boutique

    Unique gifts, books, and information for the nature lovers in your life. Adding more items as time allows: Wild Ozark Nature Boutique.

  • Become a Patron

    A small monthly stipend of even $1 from enough supporters will help me continue the educational outreach and construction of habitat gardens. More information here: https://www.patreon.com/wildozark

Thank you for reading and/or participating in this Wild Ozark community! ~ Madison Woods

Ginseng in November and a Witch Hazel, too

On a whim, I went out to see how the ginseng looked now. I knew it would be dead and wasn’t sure I’d find any. But the four-prong that grows in the nursery plot was still identifiable, at least.

Only three prongs left and falling apart, this is how ginseng looks in November in the Ozarks.
Only three prongs left (it was a four prong) and falling apart, this is how ginseng looks in November in the Ozarks.
A closer view of the curled and dead leaves on the ginseng in November.
A closer view of the curled and dead leaves on the ginseng in November.

You can see more photos of that plant throughout the growing season at the page Ginseng Through the Seasons.

Witch Hazel

I had gone out initially to look for witch hazel blooming and to see if I could gather a few of the nuts before they dispersed. Last year’s nuts are ready to gather when this year’s flowers bloom.

But I missed it, I think. Either that or the rain beat most of the flowers off the trees. I did find a few, but they were pathetic. Here’s one of the flowers that were left. They already look bedraggled by nature, but this one seems a little more so worse for wear.

One of the bedraggled witch hazel blooms left.
One of the bedraggled witch hazel blooms left.

The Wild Ozark Newsletter

I started working on my monthly newsletter last week and found I had a lot more to write about that I at first thought. It got a little out of hand and I ended up with enough to make a mini book of information on mullein. So that’s what I did. The newsletter will still go out as usual, and it is a little longer than usual, but I’ve also turned it into an ebook and added all of what I’d gathered about mullein.

In the newsletter I do my usual musing/rambling and gave a recipe and procedure for mullein decoction. In the ebook, it’s the same as the newsletter but with more mullein info. Subscribers can get the PDF free. Sign up for that at the bottom of this email. If you want it on your Kindle, it’ll be at Amazon soon.

I won’t be sending a December newsletter. I have too many things on the back burners that need to be moved to the fore and so December is just going to be too hectic already. Perhaps I’ll get to make a few more blog posts than lately, and I hope to make some sketches. I’m working on one today, in fact.

Now called Wild Ozark Musings

The Wild Ozark Newsletters will be called Wild Ozark Musings in the future, and I’ll post the November one here at the blog after the subscribers get it. It’ll probably be next week before I post it here. Hopefully it’ll go out to subscribers in the next day or two. Only the four seasonal issues will become ebooks (I think)… or I might be in the mood to do this every month, sort of like a magazine. We’ll see how this one is received. It’s too much  work if it doesn’t gain an audience.

Here’s the cover for the November ebook issue:

The cover for the Autumn 2015 issue of Wild Ozark Musings where mullein is featured.
The cover for the Autumn 2015 issue of Wild Ozark Musings where mullein is featured.
I ♥ Wild Ozark's blog! #Nature www.wildozark.com Click To Tweet

About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


Ways You Can Support Wild Ozark

  • Spread the Word

    Share this post or tell a friend about my website. "From little acorns do mighty oaks grow." A little thing like sharing could start momentum! This is a free and tremendously powerful way to help.

  • Buy a Book

    See all of my books here: Madison Woods Amazon Author's Page.

  • Shop at our Nature Boutique

    Unique gifts, books, and information for the nature lovers in your life. Adding more items as time allows: Wild Ozark Nature Boutique.

  • Become a Patron

    A small monthly stipend of even $1 from enough supporters will help me continue the educational outreach and construction of habitat gardens. More information here: https://www.patreon.com/wildozark

Thank you for reading and/or participating in this Wild Ozark community! ~ Madison Woods

Busy Days at Wild Ozark

I’ve been busy lately, but you wouldn’t know it from my lack of posts to the blog. New projects started (Wild Ozark Nature Journal) and a new website to go with it, new products, and new adventures. Last Friday I spoke at Compton Gardens in Bentonville about the habitat of American ginseng. Afterwards I talked with people, sold and autographed books. That was a new thing for me, and it was lots of fun! I think I’m almost over my fear of public speaking 🙂

Back to Market

I’m finally able to get back to the Huntsville Farmer’s Market on Tuesdays and Saturdays. The one today was disappointing. I thought with Bikes Blues & BBQ there would be more browsers at least. But there was hardly any traffic stopping at our little market. Lots of traffic passing us by, though.

I did get a very nice visit in with my friends Duke and Kim Pennell from Pen-L publishing, though. We had a great lunch at the Madison County Coffee Shop and lots of “shop” talk about publishing, authoring, and marketing.

Since the flood, my booth features a different selection of items than it did before. I lost most of the plants so now you’ll find herbal balms (featuring our local American ginseng), books, ginseng information, and nature journal crafts.

I’m usually there on Tuesdays and Fridays from 7-12, but this coming Saturday there won’t be a market because instead there’s a car show. To keep up with the most current info on where I’ll be and when, follow my FB page. If I haven’t posted about it, feel free to email or message me or post on my timeline to ask.

Nature Journal

  • Daily entries featuring a sketch and a bit of musing about my choice of subject or setting.

Here’s an excerpt from the post part of today’s entry:

I love rocks. I love collecting them, especially the ones with fossils embedded. I also like sitting on them. When I find a rock to sit on, I like to just listen. When you sit alone in nature you’ll hear a lot of sounds. At first you’ll hear the loudest, closest, or most prevalent sounds. But then you’ll start to notice the other more subtle ones that are usually overlooked by people in a hurry on on a mission to get from point a to point b. – excerpt from the new Wild Ozark Nature Journal (Day 6)

New Products

  • Balms with American Ginseng
  • Post and Note Cards and Prints using my Nature Journal Entries

 

I ♥ Wild Ozark's blog! #Nature www.wildozark.com Click To Tweet

About the voice behind this blog, Madison Woods

I'm a creative old soul living way off the beaten path with my husband in the wild Ozark Mountains. Besides homesteading, growing plants & making crafty things and newsletters, I write books and stories. My rural fantasy fiction, written under the pen name, Ima Erthwitch, usually takes place in a much altered Ozarks.


Ways You Can Support Wild Ozark

  • Spread the Word

    Share this post or tell a friend about my website. "From little acorns do mighty oaks grow." A little thing like sharing could start momentum! This is a free and tremendously powerful way to help.

  • Buy a Book

    See all of my books here: Madison Woods Amazon Author's Page.

  • Shop at our Nature Boutique

    Unique gifts, books, and information for the nature lovers in your life. Adding more items as time allows: Wild Ozark Nature Boutique.

  • Become a Patron

    A small monthly stipend of even $1 from enough supporters will help me continue the educational outreach and construction of habitat gardens. More information here: https://www.patreon.com/wildozark

Thank you for reading and/or participating in this Wild Ozark community! ~ Madison Woods