"Brahman Baby", in bone black, creek shale, and willow black. At the point now where I'll begin adding details, refining highlights and shadows. You can see the whole process by going to the post at my Wild Ozark site.

Brahman Baby in Gray-scale

© Gabby Phillips

So I’ve got something entirely new and out of my usual realm drying on the easel.

If you scroll down, you can watch “Brahma Baby” in progress, from start to finish.

If you’d like a print of this painting then click here.

There are several differences between this painting and the others I’ve done. First, I’m using a different paper. It’s Fabriano Artistico 300# hot press. Previously I’d been using Arches cold press. It does make a difference, and so far, I think I’m liking this one better, though I don’t know if its the brand that makes the difference so much as the hot vs cold press surface. I’ll have to try Arches 300# hot press next time to make a comparison.

Second, it’s a lot larger than my previous paintings. Also, the subject matter is different. The cow was a special request, but I got to pick which cow to do. I’ve always loved Brahmans, so this cute little calf was my pick. And last, I’ve never worked more than a swatch in gray-tones. I am finding that I like it.

Brahman Baby in Progress

Colors used are all Ozark pigments: Bone black, Willow Black, and Creek Shale. I may add some brown tints in there at the end, but I’m undecided on that right now. Here’s a post about how to make these paints, if you’re interested in that aspect of things.

Brahman baby in progress. Starting out with a little smudge and splatter using creek shale and charcoal dust.
Brahman baby in progress. Starting out with a little smudge and splatter using creek shale and charcoal dust.
I don't use pencil to draw in my rough sketch, because I don't want to have to erase mistakes. So I use a color of paint that's easy to lift if needed and do it with paintbrush.
I don’t use pencil to draw in my rough sketch, because I don’t want to have to erase mistakes. So I use a color of paint that’s easy to lift if needed and do it with paintbrush.
Adding some of the defining features to give me some direction going forward.
Adding some of the defining features to give me some direction going forward.
Blocking in the color, defining the eyes and nose better.
Blocking in the color, defining the eyes and nose better.
Brahman Baby in progress. Continuing to add layers of shades of gray and black. This will continue until I'm ready to begin adding the details.
Continuing to add layers of shades of gray and black. This will continue until I’m ready to begin adding the details.
Adding more color to "Brahman Baby"
Adding more color to “Brahman Baby”
"Brahman Baby", in bone black, creek shale, and willow black. At the point now where I'll begin adding details, refining highlights and shadows. You can see the whole process by going to the post at my Wild Ozark site.
“Brahman Baby”, in bone black, creek shale, and willow black.

My Other Paintings

If you want to see the other paintings I’ve made using Paleo Paints, click the button below to go to my gallery page.

Buy Prints

If you’d like to buy prints of my work, most of them are offered at my Etsy shop. They’re also at Kingston Square Arts in Kingston, AR and at the gallery in War Eagle Mill in Clifty, AR.

Madison Woods is an author, artist, and Paleo Paint maker living
with her husband in northwest Arkansas far off the beaten path. She uses Ozark pigments to create her paintings.

To see her paintings click here.

Contact Info:
Email: [email protected]
Instagram: @wildozark
Facebook: @wildozark

P.S…

I do take commissions, but am booked until late July. Use the contact info above to get in touch if you want a portrait of your earth-colored creature. Sorry, I can’t do blue or green, as those don’t exist in my range of Ozark light-fast pigments.

All works will be done in Ozark pigments in my style. You can see other paintings I’ve done at PaleoPaints.com. Some subjects take longer than others. It depends on the amount of colors, shades, and details. This cow took a few days. The birds can take weeks. Additionally, if I don’t have the necessary colors on hand, I’ll have to gather the rocks and make the paint 😉

Prices for commissions or Original Works

These prices are subject to change without notice. Please contact me to confirm. I’ll try to keep this updated, though.

20″ x 16″ – $1200
16″ x 12″ – $800
10″ x 8″ – $375
7″ x 5″ – $250

Custom Drawing – “Slug on Poison Ivy”

This is a custom drawing of a slug on poison ivy. In this post I’ll show you the process I use for drawing a picture with Prismacolor pencils. This particular nature drawing is for a business card client.

First, the Slug

I needed to do the slug first because it would have been very hard to leave the exact space for it had I done the leaves first.

Custom drawing for business card client

Leaf Shading in Progress

Leaf shading in progress on custom drawing.

I always add the lightest highlights first with a white pencil, and after the initial outline is done. There’s no way to put them in there once the darker colors are in place.

After the highlights I’ll add light shading with the predominant color. Then add the shadows and darker accents, like the spots on the leaf, the chewed part of the broken leaf, and the darker parts where the stems meet.

Leaf Shading Almost Finished

I just need to add some more of the lighter green highlights that are on the upper leaf. Then the blending will commence.

Leaf shading finished.

Shading

You can see the difference that blending makes. I didn’t know about this when I first started with the pencils, but it makes a huge difference. I use a colorless blending pencil from Prismacolor to do it. I might work on this leaf a little more.

Not yet blended.
Not yet blended

Blended.
Blended.

Finished!

Slug on Poison Ivy
Slug on Poison Ivy

Materials Used

I use Prismacolor Premier Pencils. For this sketch the colors I used were:

  • PC 946 Dark Brown
  • PC1100 China Blue
  • PC 910 True Green
  • PC 1056 Warm Grey
  • PC 938 White
  • PC 989 Chartreuse
  • PC 1020 Celadon Green
  • PC 940 Sand
  • PC 988 Marine Green
  • PC 1090 Kelp Green (predominant green)
  • PC 1082 Chocolate
  • Prismacolor Colorless Blending pencil

The paper is “pura velvet” fine art paper from Breathing Color. This paper works well for the original drawing and for printing.

Unique, Custom Drawing

Artist for Hire

If you’re interested in having me create a custom drawing for your business cards (or for any other purpose), contact me at [email protected].

My rates are $50/hr.

I can draw almost anything with a photo, but the best drawings to use for things like business cards or logos are of an individual item, so keep that in mind.

A sketch such as the slug in this post takes me approximately 4 – 6 hours, but I don’t work on it non-stop so the finished project will take a few days.

The original drawing is on 8.5″ x 11″ fine art rag paper and will be signed, matted and framed when complete. I keep this for shows and to use in various other designs, but I’ll never use it for anyone else’s business card image, or for whatever other purpose the drawing was commissioned for.

Prints will be available to the general public. If you want to have exclusive rights to use the drawing in any form for any purpose, ask me about exclusive rights licensing when the work is commissioned. These rights are no longer available once I’ve created other items from the drawing.

Client receives the first signed & numbered print at no added cost with nonexclusive rights.